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Downtime and Performance Issues? Detect the root cause with SQL Sentry
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In these books, you will find useful, hand-picked articles that will help give insight into some of your most vexing performance problems. These articles were written by several of the SQL Server industry’s leading experts, including Paul White, Paul Randal, Jonathan Kehayias, Erin Stellato, Glenn Berry, Aaron Bertrand, and Joe Sack.

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Paul White is an independent SQL Server consultant specializing in performance tuning, execution plans, and the query optimizer.

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Latest Builds of SQL Server 2019

Last updated: September 23rd, 2020

SQL Server 2019 became generally available on November 4th, 2019. Along with it came an important servicing update (GDR1 – 4517790) which should absolutely be installed in every environment. I really wish they could have just made that part of setup, but timing didn't work out; I hope I don't come across any RTM bits at any point in the future. If anything you should be on the latest cumulative update.

In some build lists you may have seen release and build dates published, but something that always felt missing was the internal database version, which can be important because it is impossible to restore a database from a higher db version to a lower one. Database version is indicated below in the DB Version column – helping to makes it clear that you can't take a backup from CTP 3.2 and restore it on CTP 3.0, for example. This internal database version is far less likely to change after GA, but it's possible; the internal database version of the latest builds of SQL Server 2017 is 869, but at GA it was 868. A different topic for a different time.

You can evaluate SQL Server 2019 here. The What's New page has summary information about all the changes, and the Release Notes contain more details and known issues. There are no deprecated engine features and no breaking changes, but there are three database scoped configuration options that have been discontinued. For feature-by-edition breakdowns, see the documentation and this blog post.

Label Build # Date KB Fixes (public) DB Version
Cumulative Update #7 15.0.4063.15 2020-09-02 KB #4570012 56 (49) 904
Please do not download. Microsoft has discovered an issue involving snapshots/CheckDB; for more info, see Cumulative Update #7 for SQL Server 2019 RTM (Removed). For now, stick with CU6, which you can get from the Microsoft Update Catalog.
Cumulative Update #6 15.0.4053.23 2020-08-04 KB #4563110 51 (42) 904
Cumulative Update #5 15.0.4043.16 2020-06-22 KB #4552255 86 (58) 904
Cumulative Update #4 15.0.4033.1 2020-03-31 KB #4548597 50 (38) 904
Cumulative Update #3 15.0.4023.6 2020-03-12 KB #4538853 56 (11) 904
Cumulative Update #2 15.0.4013.40 2020-02-13 KB #4536075 134 (88) 904
Cumulative Update #1 15.0.4003.23 2020-01-07 KB #4527376 83 (62) 904
GDR1 15.0.2070.41 2019-11-04 KB #4517790 1 904
RTM / GA 15.0.2000.5 2019-11-04     904
Pre-RTM
Label Build # Date DB Version
RC1.1 Refresh 15.0.1900.47 2019-08-29 904
RC1 15.0.1900.25 2019-08-01 904
CTP 3.2 15.0.1800.32 2019-07-24 904
CTP 3.1 15.0.1700.37 2019-06-26 902
CTP 3.0 15.0.1600.8 2019-05-17 902
CTP 2.5 15.0.1500.28 2019-04-15 897
CTP 2.4 15.0.1400.75 2019-03-16 897
CTP 2.3 15.0.1300.359 2019-02-15 897
CTP 2.2 15.0.1200.24 2018-12-05 896
CTP 2.1 15.0.1100.94 2018-11-01 896
CTP 2.0 15.0.1000.34 2018-09-18 895